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1/21/14 Letter to Wendy Kuehner NYS DOH Center for Environmental Health Requesting Assistance in Educating School Decision Makers on Subject of POPs Exposure Minimization

1/21/14

Wendy Kuehner

New York State Department of Health

Center for Environmental Health

Troy, NY USA

Dear Ms. Kuehner,

In a letter dated 12/17/13, I wrote to you proposing dialogue on the creation of an educational piece that would serve to inform school decision makers on the subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure minimization.  I continue to wait for a valid response to this request.

You left me a message in voice mail earlier today.  In this message you state that the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) is responsible for establishing standards for the content of school lunches.  I am aware of this fact.  The USDA is not interested in protecting public health in so far as minimization of POPs exposure is concerned.  I have made repeated attempts to communicate with USDA regarding POPs exposure minimization and have received no valid response.

In your message you request my assistance with accessing the 2010 World Health Organization report, “Persistent Organic Pollutants:  Impact on Child Health”.  You can access this report at the URL named below.

http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/persistent_organic_pollutant/en/

It is the responsibility of the Center for Environmental Health to provide New York State residents with information about avoidable health hazards.  Thus, it is the responsibility of the Center for Environmental Health to educate New Yorkers concerning POPs exposure minimization.  Creation of an educational piece on the subject of POPs exposure minimization would constitute a significant step in educating on this subject.

Please communicate via telephone or email to begin discussing the creation of the educational piece referred to above and in my letter dated 12/17/13.

Thank you for your attention to this correspondence.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

David O. Carpenter MD Shares Expert Knowledge on the Subjects of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure and Disease Outcome with Focus on Akwesasne

Notice of Teleconference Recording Availability
12/28/13

Donald L. Hassig, Producer
Cancer Action News Network
315.262.2456
______________________________

_________________________________________

David O. Carpenter MD Shares Expert Knowledge on the Subjects of Persistent
Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure and Disease Outcome with Focus on Akwesasne

David O. Carpenter, MD, Director of the State University of New York
University at Albany Institute for Health and the Environment presents
information on the subjects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
exposure and damages to health. Dr. Carpenter is an internationally
recognized scientific expert on POPs exposure and health effects.
POPs are contaminants of animal fats.  All animal fat containing
foods, including:  meats, fish, dairy products and eggs contain
harmful concentrations of POPs.  The harm caused by POPs exposure
occurs as a result of gestational exposure and lifelong accumulation
of these chemical substances in the bodies of exposed individuals.

Much of Dr. Carpenter’s research has been conducted on the Akwesasne
Reserve.  The First Nations people who reside at Akwesasne have
received exposures to PCBs as a result of the use and disposal of
these substances at industrial facilities located in the Town of
Massena.  PCBs are some of the most well studied of the POPs.
Research has demonstrated that Akwesasne residents suffer PCB
associated health effects including diminished cognitive function,
hypothyroidism and diabetes.  Studies have shown that both oral and
respiratory exposure are significant PCB exposure routes for this
population.  Respiratory exposures occur due to the evaporation of
PCBs from contaminated soils and sediments.

Dr. Carpenter made this presentation for Lorraine Kourofsky, Interim
Director of the St. Lawrence County Public Health Department. The
purpose of the presentation was to provide Ms. Kourofsky with
knowledge of the POPs exposure health hazard. Cancer Action NY
advocates for action by the St. Lawrence County Public Health
Department to provide residents of Akwesasne and St. Lawrence County
with educational outreach on the subject of POPs exposure
minimization. What Dr. Carpenter states on this conference call makes
clear the importance of providing the public with information on POPs
exposure and damages to health.  POPs exposure can be minimized by
cleaning up contaminated sites and choosing to eat little or no animal
fats.

The unedited recording of this conference call is available at the URL
found below.

http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/73453

12/26/13 Letter to Congressman William Owens Requesting Opportunity to Talk About Dialogue with US Department of Agriculture on Subject of POPs Exposure Minimization Via Changes in School Lunches

12/26/13

Hon. William Owens
US House of Representatives
Washington, DC USA

Dear Congressman Owens,

I would like to speak with you for fifteen minutes about my request
for assistance initiating dialogue with the US Department of
Agriculture on the subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
exposure minimization via reductions in the animal fat content of
school lunches.  You have provided a considerable amount of assistance
with communicating with federal government entities on matters
involving POPs exposure minimization.  Nevertheless, it continues to
be the case that the federal government public health entities fail to
take any action to provide the public with information on the subject
of POPs exposure minimization.  It is clear that it will take a great
amount of effort to overcome the influence of corporate entities in
the chemicals and foods sectors of the economy.  Please try to
understand why it is necessary to make repeated efforts in the arena
of environmental health protection.

Thank you for your attention to this request.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

12/20/13 News Release: Free Speech for Cancer Prevention Prevails at North Country Hockey Game

Free Speech for Cancer Prevention Prevails at North Country Hockey Game

On December 18, 2013, I exercised my freedom of speech at the Canton Pavilion, in the Village of Canton, New York by standing in the main hallway of this local sports venue during the time when hockey fans were arriving for the high school boys game between Canton and Salmon River.  I held a three-fold display board with the message “POPs Cause Cancer” and dual health hazard advisories for people and pets that explained the basic facts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure, disease outcome and exposure minimization.  The advisories recommended consuming little or no animal fats so as to minimize POPs exposure.

Many residents of the Akwesasne Reserve attend the schools of the Salmon River Central School District.  The people of Akwesasne have been poisoned with PCBs as a result of the use and disposal of PCBs at industrial facilities located in the Town of Massena.  PCBs are some of the most well studied chemicals of the larger group of chemical substances referred to as POPs.  Akwesasne residents can be much benefited by action to minimize ongoing PCB and total POPs exposure.

A few people stopped and asked questions.  There were many who saw the information, but chose not to say anything.  It is very clear that Americans are quite uncomfortable with the subjects of chemical exposure and damages to health.  This anxiety in response to scientific knowledge on these subjects can only have originated in brainwashing.  Chemical corporations and government have influenced public thinking to the extent that these subjects are considered taboo.

Grassroots educational outreach on exposure minimization is the only way to move forward with raising public awareness concerning these matters.  I am happy to say that no one at the Canton Pavilion asked me to leave.  There is an opening here.  I love my freedom of speech.  The good work of using scientific knowledge to protect public health moves slowly ahead in the land of the free.

12/12/13 Letter to Superinten​dent Jane Collins Concerning Making a Presentati​on to the Board of Education of the Salmon River Central School District on Subject of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure Minimizati​on

12/12/13

Jane Collins, Superintendent
Salmon River Central School District
Fort Covington, NY USA

Dear Superintendent Collins,

I plan to attend the December 16, 2013 meeting of the Board of
Education to make a brief presentation on the subject of persistent
organic pollutants (POPs) exposure minimization.  POPs are toxic,
man-made chemicals that are fat soluble.  These toxicants are present
in all animal fats, including the fats found in foods of the
mainstream food supply:  meats, fish, dairy products, eggs and
processed foods in which animal fat is used as an ingredient.  Changes
in school lunch menus are effective actions for POPs exposure
minimization.  My purpose in making the short presentation is to
obtain an agenda spot for making a full presentation.  A full
presentation on this subject requires approximately one half hour.

Thank you for your interest in the use of scientific knowledge to
protect student health.  Please see the letter and media advisory
provided below for further background on this matter.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Donald Hassig <donaldhassig@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 8 Nov 2013 16:43:16 -0500
Subject: 11/8/13 Letter to Natasha Jock, Salmon River Central School
District Concerning Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure
Minimization
To: njock@mail.fehb.org

11/8/13

Natasha Jock
Salmon River Central School District

Dear Ms. Jock,

As a result of the use of PCBs at the industrial facilities located in the
Town of Massena, the people of the Akwesasne Reserve have received harmful
exposures to this group of chemicals.  PCBs are some of the most well
studied chemicals belonging to the large group of chemical substances
referred to as persistent organic pollutants (POPs).  Over the course of
the past several decades a great quantity of scientific knowledge has
accumulated on the damages to health imposed by exposure to POPs.  The 2010
World Health Organization report, “Persistent Organic Pollutants:  Impact
on Child Health” recommends action to minimize the POPs exposure received
by children.  Minimizing consumption of animal fats is a key strategy for
minimizing POPs exposure.  You can access this report at the URL found
below.

http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/persistent_organic_pollutant/en/

The residents of Akwesasne suffer much disease, including:  cancers, heart
disease and type 2 diabetes.  These diseases are associated with POPs
exposure. Minimization of exposure to PCBs and the other POPs would reduce
disease risk among the people of Akwesasne.

I would like to discuss POPs exposure minimization with a focus on
minimizing the animal fat content of school lunches served in Salmon River
Central School District schools.  Forty five minutes would be a sufficient
time for my presentation on this subject.

Thank you for your attention to this request.

joyous in Nature,

Donald L. Hassig
_______________________________________________________________________

Media Advisory
12/12/13

Donald L. Hassig, Director
Cancer Action NY
315.262.2456
________________________________________________________________________

Minimizing PCB and Total POPs Exposure Via Changes in School Lunches
Presentation for Salmon River Board of Education

Monday, December 16, 2013, 6:00 PM

Salmon River School, 637 CR 1, Fort Covington, NY USA

The school lunch makes up a significant part of what children eat.
School lunch programs are required to provide certain information to
the New York State Department of Education.  The percentage of fat in
school lunch meals is included in this information.  Percentages of
fat in school lunches served in the Canton and Colton-Pierrepont
School Districts were reported as 27.69 percent and 29.84 percent
respectively.  (The reported information did not include a breakdown
for vegetable fats and animal fats.  Only percentage of total fat was
reported.  The total fat percentages provided were % Kcals.  In the
case of fats, % Kcals is higher than percent by mass.)

Major retailer meatballs are approximately 30 percent fat by mass.
Prepared meals available in the supermarket range from less than 10
percent fat to over 20 percent fat.  No prepared meals were found to
have a percentage of fat as high as 30 percent by mass.

School lunch meals are nearly 30 percent fat with regards to caloric
content because fat is cheap.  School districts feed children very low
cost food.  At a time when animal fats are contaminated with PCBs and
other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including:  dioxins,
brominated flame retardants and fat soluble pesticides such as DDT.
Mirex and Toxaphene, it is unsound to feed children meals with a 30
percent fat content.  Considering the fact that meatballs, chicken
patties, sausage and ravioli are all on the school lunch menu, it is
likely that animal fats constitute a major fraction of total fat in
school lunches.

In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) published, “Persistent
Organic Pollutants:  Impact on Child Health”.  This report was created
to provide health professionals with an understanding of POPs exposure
and disease outcome.  Scientific evidence indicates that current
levels of POPs in the animal fat portion of the food supply are
causing serious harm to health.  POPs exposure is associated with
diseases and disorders, including:  cancers, type 2 diabetes, heart
disease, autoimmune diseases, reproductive problems, autism, ADHD and
cognitive impairments.  WHO recommends action to minimize the exposure
that children receive to POPs.

School lunches should be much lower than 30 percent fat in terms of
caloric content.  The federal government guidelines for fat content of
school lunches are not sufficiently restrictive to protect against
POPs exposure.  This lack of stringency is due to corporate influence
upon the federal government agencies responsible for setting food
consumption guidelines.

12/9/13 Media Advisory: Minimizing PCB and Total POPs Exposure Via Changes in School Lunches

Minimizing PCB and Total POPs Exposure Via Changes in School Lunches
Presentation for Salmon River Board of Education

Monday, December 9, 2013, 6:00 PM

Salmon River School, 637 CR 1, Fort Covington, NY USA

The school lunch makes up a significant part of what children eat.
School lunch programs are required to provide certain information to
the New York State Department of Education.  The percentage of fat in
school lunch meals is included in this information.  Percentages of
fat in school lunches served in the Canton and Colton-Pierrepont
School Districts were reported as 27.69 percent and 29.84 percent
respectively.  (The reported information did not include a breakdown
for vegetable fats and animal fats.  Only percentage of total fat was
reported.  The total fat percentages provided were % Kcals.  In the
case of fats, % Kcals is higher than percent by mass.)

Major retailer meatballs are approximately 30 percent fat by mass.
Prepared meals available in the supermarket range from less than 10
percent fat to over 20 percent fat.  No prepared meals were found to
have a percentage of fat as high as 30 percent by mass.

School lunch meals are nearly 30 percent fat with regards to caloric
content because fat is cheap.  School districts feed children very low
cost food.  At a time when animal fats are contaminated with PCBs and
other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including:  dioxins,
brominated flame retardants and fat soluble pesticides such as DDT.
Mirex and Toxaphene, it is unsound to feed children meals with a 30
percent fat content.  Considering the fact that meatballs, chicken
patties, sausage and ravioli are all on the school lunch menu, it is
likely that animal fats constitute a major fraction of total fat in
school lunches.

In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) published, “Persistent
Organic Pollutants:  Impact on Child Health”.  This report was created
to provide health professionals with an understanding of POPs exposure
and disease outcome.  Scientific evidence indicates that current
levels of POPs in the animal fat portion of the food supply are
causing serious harm to health.  POPs exposure is associated with
diseases and disorders, including:  cancers, type 2 diabetes, heart
disease, autoimmune diseases, reproductive problems, autism, ADHD and
cognitive impairments.  WHO recommends action to minimize the exposure
that children receive to POPs.

School lunches should be much lower than 30 percent fat in terms of
caloric content.  The federal government guidelines for fat content of
school lunches are not sufficiently restrictive to protect against
POPs exposure.  This lack of stringency is due to corporate influence
upon the federal government agencies responsible for setting food
consumption guidelines.

3/18/14 Action Advisory: Advocating for Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure Minimization Education Before St. Lawrence County Board of Health

Advocating for Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Exposure Minimization Education Before St. Lawrence County Board of Health

March 18, 2014, 6:00 PM

Room 202, St. Lawrence County Human Services Building, State Route 310, Canton, NY USA

Cancer Action NY has worked for a considerable period of time to motivate St. Lawrence County government to begin providing educational outreach on the subject of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure minimization to residents of Akwesasne and St. Lawrence County.  This matter will come before the St. Lawrence County Board of Health at its next scheduled meeting.  Obtaining the support of the Board of Health is a key step in creating an educational outreach on POPs exposure minimization within the Public Health Department.

Past and ongoing PCB exposures at Akwesasne and in St. Lawrence County make POPs exposure minimization an important part of public health protection.  Minimizing POPs exposure will reduce risk of developing diseases and disorders, including:  cancer, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, autoimmune diseases, reproductive problems, autism, hypothyroidism, ADHD and cognitive impairments.

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